DIY ash wood stand for weights and bars for home gyms

I used anti-scratch polyurethane lacquer for the rack used to store and organize the weights and the dumbbells

Since we started woodworking, we have created and designed a lot of pieces of furniture suitable to arrange different spaces from apartments (bedrooms, living rooms, kitchens, bathrooms, hallways), to houses (stairs, steps and solid oak railings), to restaurants (counter tops, benches, table tops, decorative crafts) to reception of the hotels. Now we have reached the fitness and gym rooms. It is true that this rack for weights and dumbbells was made for a home gym, but that does not mean it does not match such locations.

We chose to make this project from ash wood. The wooden racks needed some heavy and secure bases at the same time, because they had to support a very heavy weight. So, the ash wood seemed the best option, considering that we used 5 cm thickness planks. We brought the planks to the size of 4 cm thickness, after planing.

We started the project from the 4 lateral legs that were made to support the weights. In order to do this, we glued four ash wood panels that we later cut to the same size. In order to give them the needed shape, we used a template made out of a MDF board. We realized (because it was already the second time when we used the template for identical repeated cuts) that using the template is the simplest method to cut multiple objects so that they have an identical shape. Using the milling machine, we cut all the four ash panels to have the same shape. The cutouts had to be identical, otherwise the weights or dumbbells would not have been correctly positioned in their places.

all four legs made out of ash wood stand are identical due to the fact that I used a handmade template to mill them
The wood carvings are made using the template
you can see that using the handmade template is very useful to be able to repeat identical cuts
The four ash wood panels were identically milled

After I brought them to the required shape by milling, the sanding followed. The big surfaces were very easy to sand. I solved the problem very quickly by using the orbital sander. The most complicated part was the sanding of the milled areas and the rounded spaces for the dumbbells. I used the band sander starting with 80 grit band for sanding the straight areas (because the milled surface had many imperfections) and then with 120 grit band. I manually sanded the rounded spaces using 80 grit sandpaper to straighten the surface as much as possible, gradually, reaching the 120 grit sandpaper so that the surface becomes smoother.

the belt sander is the most suitable device for the rapid sanding of the wood areas with deep imperfections
The straight areas are sanded with the band sander
I used anti-scratch polyurethane lacquer for the rack used to store and organize the weights and the dumbbells
The rounded corners and a perfect finish

Then, we sanded the outer rounded areas which we could easily sand them using the finishing sander. We manually rounded the edges with 120 grit sandpaper so as not to remain sharp.

In order to fix the milled wooden sides, two by two, we glued another panel, also made out of 4 cm thickness ash wood. We cut the wooden panel into 4 smaller panels: 2 of them used for the bases and 2 of them used for the backs of the racks. This way we have greatly increased their stability.

the shape of the rack for weights and bars allows them to be placed next to each other or with a distance between them
The two racks for dumbbells can be placed either next to each other or at a distance from each other

After we sanded them we fixed them on the milled sides using screws and glue. We preferred to use screws as the mechanical fixing is safer than the one by only using glue. We drilled holes before screwing them to hide the heads of the screws by using wooden dowels (otherwise they would be unsightly). The aspect of the wooden dowel is more pleasant than the aspect of a screw head.

we used wooden dowels to hide the screws with which we fixed the back and the sides of the rack for storing weights and dumbbells
Wooden dowels used for fixing the back

After screwing the wooden base and the back of the rack, we measured, we cut and we fixed in the same way (with screws and dowels) the two triangles (actually four: two on each rack). These triangles were going to give to the racks even more rigidity, the more so as their shape is inclined towards the back.

we screwed two ash wood triangles on the back, in order to increase the rigidity and the stability of the rack for the dumbbells and weights
The triangular shaped wooden pieces used for stiffening and stabilizing the ash wood racks
we used as many 4 cm thickness ash panels to harden the base of the rack so as to give it as much stability as possible
The bases of the racks are heavy enough to support the dumbbells without problems

The final finish was made with anti-scratch primer and polyurethane varnish. It was necessary to use a polyurethane varnish because these racks would support some heavy iron bars.

we applied anti-scratch polyurethane primer and varnish to increase the protection when handling the weights and the dumbbells
Finishing the weights racks with anti-scratch polyurethane primer and varnish
the shape of the rack for weights and bars allows them to be placed next to each other or with a distance between them
The two racks for dumbbells can be placed either next to each other or at a distance from each other

Here is the final result:

I have very carefully sanded all the rounded edges of this model of weights and dumbells rack
A detail with the finish of all roundness of this weights and dumbbells rack
we built this stand out of ash wood for dumbbells to fit both in an apartment room and in a large fitness or gym room
The solid ash wood supports, for dumbbells or weights, are perfect for a modern fitness or gym room

2 Comments on “DIY ash wood stand for weights and bars for home gyms”

    1. I will try to find the plans and upload them (I hope they are still out there on my disk, somewhere). They are in metric though, so please let me know if you need them converted to imperial.

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